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CNN Interview with Shannon Cook

G’day everyone!

Here is an interview I did with CNN’s Shannon Cook earlier in the year talking about my battle with depression and ill-health.

http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/showbiz/2012/08/01/nr-the-wiggles-cook-intv.cnn

ABC Books Advertisement

G’day everyone,
Here’s a promo that ABC Books aired recently to advertise the release of ‘How I Got My Wiggle Back’ in Australia.

Read more →

Interview on ABC Radio

G’Day everyone,

I’ve just had an interview on The Guestroom, ABC Radio. Check it out!
http://www.abc.net.au/local/audio/2012/03/13/3452380.htm?site=darwin

-Anto

New York

Wow, what a couple of days!
Fly to New York for 48 hours of publicity for the book then back to Australia to start shooting a new Wiggles DVD. I think that qualifies as a long commute.  Read more →

Interview On The Today Show

G’day everyone!

Earlier this morning I did an interview on Channel 9′s Today Show on how I overcame depression and a life-threatening illness. It should be noted that this interview is aimed at an adult audience.

To watch the interview, click here.

 

Early Book Release

A couple of snaps of the book on the shelves at Barnes & Noble in New York, ahead of the official release on February 1st.

 

At Barnes & Noble in Tribeca

Close-up

Preface

How I Got My Wiggle Back

If you’re over five, without children and live in a dark cave you probably don’t know that The Wiggles are the most successful pop band for preschool age children of all time.

While studying to be a preschool teacher in Australia, Anthony Field (the Blue Wiggle) recruited a couple of fellow early childhood education students— singer Greg Page (Yellow), guitarist Murray Cook (Red), and a mate from his old rock ‘n’ roll group, keyboardist Jeff Fatt (Purple)—to record a little music for children and the rest, as The Wiggles’ character Dorothy the Dinosaur might say, is pre-history.

But for the record, they have dominated children’s music in Australia for two decades and since the turn of the century have done a good job of making an Australian accent a common phenomenon in North American and British households with preschool age children. Read more →